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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
the conflict began. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt life at the united nations for us again tonight. jonathan, the foreign minister's speech must have raised a lot of eyebrows in that place. >> to say the least, shep. it amounted to an argument that syria is involved essentially in a battle for survival of its government. it is a war of self-defense. the country has, in his words, been overrun by terrorists. and they are being aided, abetted, and encouraged by outside forces, including the united states. and the ones who are suffering most, according to the foreign minister, are the government and their representatives. listen. >> syria has lost thousands of marchers from among its military ranks and civilians as a price for its efforts to defend the integrity of the syrian state and its citizens in the face of this global terrorist campaign. >> the syrian foreign minister also said his government remains committed and willing to talk to all the opposition groups in an effort to find a solution. those opposition groups, not surprisingly, dismissed those commence -- comments
reid in boston. thanks. >>> for more on campaign 2012, we turn to jonathan allen, a senior political correspondent from politico. jonathan, good morning to you. >> good morning, rebecca. >> i want to begin where chip left off. the president's advisors say he's been so busy dealing with international affairs coming into the debate he hasn't had a chance to prepare. some of the tlmts coming out of these international affairs, the administration's stance, for example, on what exactly happened in benghazi has recently changed. i wonder how that might impact this debate. >> i would be shocked if there wasn't some questioning from that either from the moderators or at least perhaps some attention drawn to it by mitt romney. this is a huge issue for the president, is his policy working in north africa, in the middle east? what happened there? did the administration tell the truth? if they didn't tell the truth, why didn't they tell the truth? i absolutely expect this to be part of the debate. the idea that the president is somehow not practiced to speak in public or engage in public debate
turn to jonathan allen, a senior political correspondent from politico. jonathan, good morning to you. >> good morning, rebecca. >> i want to begin where chip left off. the president's advisors say he's been so busy dealing with international affairs coming into the debate he hasn't had a chance to prepare. some of the tlmts coming out of these international affairs, the administration's stance, for example, on what exactly happened in benghazi has recently changed. i wonder how that might impact this debate. >> i would be shocked if there wasn't some questioning from that either from the moderators or at least perhaps some attention drawn to it by mitt romney. this is a huge issue for the president, is his policy working in north africa, in the middle east? what happened there? did the administration tell the truth? if they didn't tell the truth, why didn't they tell the truth? i absolutely expect this to be part of the debate. the idea that the president is somehow not practiced to speak in public or engage in public debate baugs he hasn't had more than a few days in nevada to prepa
jonathan capehart and victor defrancesco and jamaal simpsons and national republican consul stant katon dawson. i'm taking professorial privilege here. we need to have a conversation on race all the time. but part of it is we need a conversation on what race actually is. >> it's a social construct nevertheless. it's a concrete pillar in the society. not just in the u.s. if you look at lat inamerica. they make the u.s. look weak. they have 16 different categorizations. we have to acknowledge that race has been with us since the founding documents. it's embedded in race. i think another document that keeps perpetuating race in our society, whether we like it or not is the census. >> yes. >> the census defines race. so we can't get away from it. we can't say we live in a racially colorblind society because we keep institutionalizing race. recently, there's a discussion of including latino as a racial category not just ethnic. create a whole new race in the next census. >> the notion that we can undo racism but undoing these data is also false. on the one hand, it's socially constructive. i
snacking portfolio. >> joining us from philadelphia for more on this is jonathan finney. thanks for joining us. when we play that interview more full earlier, what he was saying is how big a percentage of sales for this new company are going to be from emerging markets. they even have more sales in europe than they do in the u.s. i don't know if that's a good thing. what do you think about the prospects of mondelez? >> i think they're pretty good prospects. they're comparable to those of a pepsico. maybe a little bit slower than those of a coca-cola. but certainly up there perhaps growth wise in the neighborhood of some of the consumer staples giants focused in emerging markets. >> is the fact that they're looking for that em is the biggest sales balance, is that the thing that would be attractive to an investor? >> that's the play. that's what they're trying to create here. that's been very thematic in the u.s. over the past 6 to 12 months. sort of disinvesting in the u.s. business and investing overseas in is of these emerging markets. my personal take is that a lot of these companies hav
be a difficult process to match for the top leadership. >> thank you to ashley and jonathan and the rest of the team it is a great honor to be here today i see some people in the audience to learn from and worked with sorry i don't have time to mention more people and i probably shouldn't because i might get names wrong. i had just flown in from victoria, british columbia having attended a nice sponsored by the canadian navy and i think i know but now about how they felt they finally made it in 2002. it's been a great journey. i couldn't be excited to be a part of the project. i remember in graduate school what princeton i purchased my tree first strategic asia volume and collection of the subsequent ones and one thing i noticed is that principle and when people move offices or left to go somewhere else the book series would be left in the free book section, but this never, ever happened with strategic asia. before i go further, i have to make the obligatory disclaimer that all of this involves my personal views, of course none of the official policy assessments of the u.s. navy and any
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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